Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

March 2018

RECESSIONS HARM HEALTH OF NEWBORNS: Evidence from England

Researchers from the University of Oxford find that recessions in England worsen the health newborn babies. According to the study by Elisabetta De... More

CARBON PRICES FOR THE NEXT HUNDRED YEARS: New research provides rule of thumb for pricing greenhouse gas emissions

The price put on greenhouse gas emissions will determine how quickly we see the phasing-out of key activities that cause climate change, including the... More

WHY MORE EDUCATED WORKERS ENJOY GREATER JOB STABILITY: US evidence

Educated Americans typically experience lower rates of unemployment than their less educated peers – not because they find jobs faster but because... More

February 2018

INCENTIVES FOR MARATHON RUNNERS

New evidence of the competing influences of prize money and strength of opposition Contests with the highest prizes do not necessarily attract the... More

ECONOMICS OF ATTENTION

Competition drives producers of the best to invest most in promotion Competition gives suppliers of the best products the incentives to invest the... More

COMBINING MONETARY AND MACROPRUDENTIAL POLICIES FOR GREATER STABILITY

Better economic outcomes can be achieved by complementing an inflation targeting policy with a macroprudential policy that leans against excessive... More

THE FINANCIAL POWER OF THE POWERLESS: Evidence from Ottoman Istanbul

In Ottoman Istanbul, privileged groups such as men, Muslims and other elites paid more for credit than the under-privileged – the exact opposite of... More

WHY GLOBALISATION IS MAKING FIRMS AND WAGES MORE UNEQUAL

Export opportunities raise the value of investing in risky innovation projects Inequality in the size of firms and the wages they pay varies greatly... More

INEQUALITY PERSISTS OVER GENERATIONS: New evidence from Germany

Your great-grandparents’ socio-economic status still predicts your status today, according to research by Sebastian Braun and Jan Stuhler, which is... More

WHEN POLITICAL INTERESTS BLOCK NEW INFRASTRUCTURE

Evidence from party connections in the age of Britain’s first transport revolution New research shows how party politics and connections slowed the... More

REDUCING CRIME THROUGH JOB OPPORTUNITIES FOR RELEASED PRISONERS

People who leave prison when there are more construction and manufacturing jobs available are better able to reintegrate into society and break the... More

MANAGING BUREAUCRATS: Evidence from the Nigerian civil service

Management practices that are effective in the private sector may not be suited to public sector bureaucracies, according to research by Imran Rasul... More

MATERNAL PERSONALITY AND CHILDREN’S EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE

Babies born to mothers who hold a stronger belief that their fate is in their own hands and not down to luck tend to perform better in their GCSE... More

MANY FRENCH TOWNS HAVE BEEN TRAPPED IN OBSOLETE PLACES FOR CENTURIES

Only three of the 20 largest cities in Britain are located near the site of Roman towns, compared with 16 in France. That is one of the findings of... More

US QUANTITATIVE EASING: The impact on other countries’ economies

The series of quantitative easing programmes implemented by the US Federal Reserve in response to the global financial crisis have had variable... More

RISING AMERICAN INEQUALITY: New evidence on winners and losers

Rising inequality in the United States since 1970 has delivered large economic gains to households in the top 20% of the income distribution. For... More

THE BATTLE FOR EXCLUSIVE EYEBALLS: Competition in media markets

The battle for ‘exclusive eyeballs’ among media platforms explains the sharp decrease in advertising revenues for mainstream media over the last 10... More

CLIMATE CHANGE HITS JOBS AND DRIVES MIGRATION: Evidence from Mexico

New research reveals the negative impact of climate change on rural labour markets, particularly for poor wage-labourer households. The study by... More

MEASURING THE GAINS FROM TRADE

If the gains from trade are small, is it worth facing the distributional consequences of globalisation and the political backlash associated with... More

PAID PARENTAL LEAVE AND CHILDREN’S COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

Prolonged paid parental leave and the opportunity it provides for mothers to spend more time with their offspring can have long lasting effects on... More

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