Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

THE OPENNESS-EQUALITY TRADE-OFF: Potential lessons from the Gulf for migration policies in OECD countries

At a time when fights over migration are dividing rich countries and fracturing their politics, a study published in the July 2018 issue of the... More

WEALTH INEQUALITY IN CHILDHOOD AND BEYOND: New Danish evidence

Even in famously egalitarian Denmark, there are people who enter adulthood with substantial wealth amassed from transfers throughout childhood. What’s... More

HOW WEALTH IS TRANSMITTED ACROSS GENERATIONS: Evidence from Sweden

Inheritances play a more important role than education and income in the transmission of wealth between parents and children: it accounts for half of... More

EXCHANGE RATE FLUCTUATIONS: The impact on cross-border shopping and commuting

Soaring franc causes Swiss shoppers to pop across to Italy each morning – while Italian workers head in the other direction A strong franc increased... More

THE EFFECTS OF REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS: Forecasts may be underestimating productivity benefits

Modern techniques for evaluating the impact of regional trade agreements like the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)... More

March 2018

TWEETING ECONOMISTS ARE LESS EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATORS THAN SCIENTISTS

When using Twitter, both economists and natural scientists communicate mostly with people outside their profession, but economists tweet less, mention... More

FOSTER CHILDREN: US evidence that kinship care leads to better adult outcomes

Former foster children who were cared for by extended family members are overwhelmingly better off than foster youth that were cared for by unrelated... More

MODERN MANAGEMENT PRACTICES THAT IMPROVE SCHOOL PERFORMANCE: UK evidence

More intensive use of modern practices of human resource management (HRM) can improve school performance, according to a new study to be presented at... More

BRIGHT CITIES: Night-time lights as an indicator of urban development

The largest cities in sub-Saharan Africa have been growing at a fastest rate than smaller, secondary cities over the period from 1992 to 2013.... More

UNDERSTANDING THE DECLINE IN LABOUR’S SHARE OF INCOME: Global evidence

Increasing investments in intangible assets, such as information and communication technologies (ICT) and complementary investments in training,... More

GETTING PEOPLE TO MAKE HEALTHIER FOOD CHOICES: Experimental evidence

Providing tailored advice about people’s health does not lead them make healthier food and drink choices. But providing standard generic health... More

POLISH IMMIGRANTS STIMULATE GERMAN INNOVATION

Even in an immigration system that is not based on skill selection, immigrants have positive effects on innovation. They contribute directly to... More

CHILDCARE POLICIES BOOST WOMEN'S WAGES AND CAREERS: Evidence from Germany

Government-provided childcare allows women, and particularly mothers, to earn higher wages and climb the career ladder more easily. That is the... More

HOME BIAS IN BANKS’ SOVEREIGN EXPOSURE DURING THE EUROZONE CRISIS

In the absence of a national central bank that could act as a financial backstop, can domestic commercial banks help to contain financial crises? Can... More

WHEN CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION MAKES THINGS WORSE: Evidence from Peru

Peruvian farmers experiencing unusually high temperatures during the growing season are adapting their behaviour in ways that will intensify the costs... More

THE LABOUR COST OF MOTHERHOOD: Evidence from Italy

Women in Italy who opted for shorter maternity leave in return for state-subsidised childcare ended up considerably less likely to leave the labour... More

SOCIAL IMMOBILITY AMONG ITALIAN LAWYERS: New evidence on nepotism

A liberalisation of Italy’s law profession in 2006 allowed more able lawyers to earn more and reduced room for nepotism, decreasing the earning... More

PROMOTING BETTER NUTRITION FOR ADOLESCENT GIRLS IN POOR COUNTRIES

Interventions to promote good nutrition and prevent pregnancy among adolescent girls in poor countries can have large benefits in terms of health... More

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE REDUCED BY BETTER EDUCATION: Evidence from Turkey

A 1997 policy change in Turkey that raised the number of years of compulsory education is associated with a lower propensity for men to engage in... More

ECONOMICS OF SPECIAL INTEREST POLITICS: Evidence for the US Congress

Applying a forensic approach to vote outcomes and donation flows in the US House of Representatives, a new study by Ulrich Matter and Michaela... More

MODERN MANAGEMENT PRACTICES THAT IMPROVE SCHOOL PERFORMANCE: UK evidence

More intensive use of modern practices of human resource management (HRM) can improve school performance, according to a new study to be presented at... More

EFFECTS OF MASS MIGRATION ON TAXES & REDISTRIBUTION: Evidence from post-war Germany

What happens to taxes and preference for redistribution when a large flow of migrants arrives in a country? New research to be presented at the Royal... More

LABOUR’S FALLING SHARE OF NATIONAL INCOME – and what to do about it

In countries where the role of the state has been reduced, the existence of a more centralised wage bargaining system has limited the extent of the... More

RECESSIONS HARM HEALTH OF NEWBORNS: Evidence from England

Researchers from the University of Oxford find that recessions in England worsen the health newborn babies. According to the study by Elisabetta De... More

CARBON PRICES FOR THE NEXT HUNDRED YEARS: New research provides rule of thumb for pricing greenhouse gas emissions

The price put on greenhouse gas emissions will determine how quickly we see the phasing-out of key activities that cause climate change, including the... More

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