Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

THE OPENNESS-EQUALITY TRADE-OFF: Potential lessons from the Gulf for migration policies in OECD countries

At a time when fights over migration are dividing rich countries and fracturing their politics, a study published in the July 2018 issue of the... More

WEALTH INEQUALITY IN CHILDHOOD AND BEYOND: New Danish evidence

Even in famously egalitarian Denmark, there are people who enter adulthood with substantial wealth amassed from transfers throughout childhood. What’s... More

HOW WEALTH IS TRANSMITTED ACROSS GENERATIONS: Evidence from Sweden

Inheritances play a more important role than education and income in the transmission of wealth between parents and children: it accounts for half of... More

EXCHANGE RATE FLUCTUATIONS: The impact on cross-border shopping and commuting

Soaring franc causes Swiss shoppers to pop across to Italy each morning – while Italian workers head in the other direction A strong franc increased... More

THE EFFECTS OF REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS: Forecasts may be underestimating productivity benefits

Modern techniques for evaluating the impact of regional trade agreements like the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)... More

March 2018

CENTRAL BANK ANNOUNCEMENTS REACH ORDINARY PEOPLE: UK and US evidence

Surveys reveal that despite all the efforts of central bankers, only 36% of the US population report hearing any news about the Fed in the past few... More

THE NEXT SERENA WILLIAMS? Choice of career in winner-take-all markets

The tiny chance of making huge amounts of money in the music industry or professional sport entices more young people to enter an occupation than... More

OVEROPTIMISTIC ENTREPRENEURS: Self-employed expect greater happiness

People who choose to leave regular employment for self-employment tend to overestimate how satisfied with life they will be in the future. This is the... More

THE BREXIT HIT TO FOREIGN INVESTMENT IN THE UK: New evidence

The UK’s departure from the EU single market may reduce the stock of foreign direct investment from Germany, France and the Netherlands by as much as... More

STARTING UNIVERSITY IN A RECESSION MEANS YOU EARN MORE

Students who start university when the economy is in bad shape end up with higher pay than other cohorts – on average, an additional £1,200 per every... More

FAMILY, FIRMS AND THE GENDER WAGE GAP IN FRANCE

New research reveals the impact of motherhood and the firms that women choose to work for on the large gender pay gap in France. Among the findings of... More

EFFECTS OF SERVICES OFFSHORING ON LOCAL LABOUR MARKETS: UK evidence

Importing services from abroad rather than producing them domestically – what's known as ‘services offshoring’ – has a positive impact on employment... More

THE EFFECT OF MINIMUM WAGES ON LOW-WAGE JOBS: New US evidence

Minimum wages set at up to 59% of the median wage have little negative effect on overall employment, according to research by Doruk Cengiz, Arindrajit... More

LOW IMPACT OF TOP PUBLIC SECTOR MANAGERS: Evidence from the NHS

Changing the chief executive of NHS hospitals makes little difference to the performance of these large and complex organisations. That is the central... More

PERSONALITIES OF STUDENTS’ PEERS INFLUENCE THEIR ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

New research investigates how university students’ achievement is influenced by the personalities of their fellow students. The study by Bart... More

ELECTORAL INCENTIVES INFLUENCE THE RECEPTION OF REFUGEES: Evidence from Italy

Local governments in Italian municipalities refuse to host refugees because they are afraid to be punished by voters and lose popular support. This... More

NEW TECHNOLOGY DRIVES THE RISE OF NON-ROUTINE JOBS: Global evidence

Technological change has increased the number of non-routine occupations relative to routine occupations in both advanced and emerging countries. That... More

DRUG TRAFFICKING DOESN’T HURT GROWTH – But the associated violence does

Drug trafficking does not have a negative effect on growth per se, but the violence enacted by drug traffickers does. That is the conclusion of... More

GLOBALISATION, GOVERNMENT POPULARITY AND THE GREAT SKILL DIVIDE

New research reveals how the popularity of governments differs among skilled and unskilled workers in response to changes in exports and imports. The... More

THE BOOM AND BUST IN UK METAL CRIME: New evidence of the impact of prices, policing and policy

Big rises in commodity prices led to a boom in metal crime in the UK, which was followed by a bust as prices fell. But policing and policy have also... More

IMPERIAL ROOTS OF TODAY’S GLOBAL TRADE: Evidence from 140 empires

The rise and fall of empires over the last 5,000 years – from the Afsharid Dynasty to the British Empire – still influences world trade patterns... More

SOCIAL MEDIA ‘BOTS’ INFLUENCE STOCK MARKET PERFORMANCE

New research looks at how public opinion can be influenced via channels such as social media, looking specifically at FTSE 100 companies. The study... More

PSYCHIC COSTS AS A BARRIER TO VACCINATION IN RURAL NIGERIA

Psychological costs are significant barriers to vaccination among women in the northern Nigeria and they reduce the vaccination rate significantly.... More

PARENTAL MONEY OR TIME? New evidence on the trade-off in child development

Is parental income or time spent with the child more important for fostering child development? New research by Francesco Agostinelli and Giuseppe... More

PUPIL EXCLUSION IN UK ACADEMIES: Strict discipline not gaming results

Higher rates of exclusion of disruptive pupils in the first wave of academy schools in England were the result of the tough disciplinary approach that... More

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