Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

March 2016

TRANSPARENCY IN PARLIAMENT: Swiss evidence of the impact on MPs’ voting behaviour

Members of parliament are more likely to vote along party lines if their choices are made public. That is the central finding of research by Christine... More

SELF-EMPLOYMENT UNDERREPORTING IN GREAT BRITAIN: Who and how much?

Reducing evasion seems to be a priority for all revenue agencies, especially now when public finances are stretched. Self-employment income suffers... More

GLOBAL INEQUALITY FUELS REVOLUTION: New cross-national evidence of the economic origins of conflict

The further a country’s development falls behind the richest countries, the more likely it is to see protests and even revolutions. That is the... More

MASS MIGRATION FROM MEXICO TO THE UNITED STATES: New evidence of the impact of family background

High fertility and large family sizes do not in themselves constitute a significant push factor in the mass migration from Mexico to the United States... More

REFUGEES IN THE UK MUCH MORE LIKELY TO SEE THEMSELVES AS BRITISH THAN ECONOMIC MIGRANTS

Immigrants who have come to the UK as refugees or because of family ties are more than twice as likely to see themselves as having a British national... More

TAXING PEOPLE’S RUBBISH: Evidence from Switzerland that they don’t like it at first but learn to live with it

People might dislike taxes on their rubbish at first – but such taxes do encourage recycling and eventually become popular. That is the main finding... More

THE EUROSYSTEM’S EXPANDED ASSET PURCHASE PROGRAMME: New evidence of domestic and international macroeconomic effects

The Eurosystem’s expanded asset purchase programme will help lift inflation towards the European Central Bank’s target and boost economic activity in... More

MOBILE PHONES AMPLIFY POLITICAL UNREST IN TIMES OF CRISIS: Evidence from across Africa

The growing use of mobile phones in Africa leads to more political protests during recessions and periods of national crisis, according to research by... More

How British ‘cafe culture’ drinks revolution ended in failure

Opening Hours and Binge Drinking More

GENDER PAY GAP MAKES WOMEN LESS LIKELY TO MOVE FIRMS

Women are typically less mobile between employers because most of them earn less than their partners. But at the same time, firms take advantage of... More

WIND POWER IN THE UNITED STATES: ‘Green’ investment is less efficient

Many US wind farms are being built in the wrong place because their investors want to look environmentally conscious. That is the central finding of... More

HOUSE PRICES RISE BY UP TO 1.5% AFTER IMPROVED OFSTED SCORE, STUDY FINDS

Local house prices rise by as much as 1.5% in the immediate aftermath of an improved Ofsted score, according to a new study of 8,000 primary schools... More

BETTER TEACHERS MEAN HAPPIER AND HIGHER-ACHIEVING PUPILS: Evidence from UK primary schools

Good teachers don’t just help children learn more: they also help them to become happier. That is one of the findings of research by Sarah Fleche, to... More

DID GOING TO COLLEGE HELP MICHAEL CORLEONE? New evidence of the benefits of education for ‘business criminals’

A mobster who completes just one extra year of education can increase, on average, his earnings by around 8%, according to a new study of the... More

YOUR LANGUAGE OR MINE? Bilingualism brings communities together

Bilingualism helps to break down barriers even when basic communication was never a problem, leading to higher rates of intermarriage between people... More

MORE EDUCATION WON’T NECESSARILY MAKE YOU RICHER: New evidence from the 1972 increase in the UK’s school leaving age

New research questions the commonly held belief that more education is necessarily ‘good for you’ and will result in higher wages and better life... More

PARENTING AND SOCIAL MOBILITY: How pre-school attention shapes society

The time that parents invest in their children when they’re pre-school explains almost half the low intergenerational mobility in the United States.... More

NEVER PUT OFF TILL TOMORROW WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: New insights on procrastination

Procrastinators are more likely to get around to onerous activities that they’d prefer to avoid when they have a buddy to do them with. They’re also... More

‘TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN’: The impact of Betfair’s ‘cash-out’ facility on betting behaviour

People who bet on football are far more likely to ‘cash out’ their bets – rather than holding them until the end of the game – if they are trading at... More

‘WE ARE IN A DEEP TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION, NOT SECULAR STAGNATION’: Ignoring this is the major risk for central bankers today

The world is undergoing a ‘deep technological revolution’ (DTR) and not a secular stagnation – and since 2009, it has fortunately done so in a context... More

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