Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

IMPACT OF LIFTING ALCOHOL RESTRICTIONS ON VIOLENT CRIME: Evidence from Kansas

Lifting or loosening restrictions on alcohol sales could lead to substantial increases in violent crime, according to research by Daniel Rees,... More

LOTTERY WINNERS CUT THEIR WORKING HOURS BUT DON’T LEAVE EMPLOYMENT: New evidence from the Netherlands

People who win big prizes in the lottery tend to work fewer hours but they don’t withdraw completely from the labour market. These are the central... More

TOWARDS EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY: New economic analysis

Any social arrangement in which just one person has no opportunities is the worst possible outcome. That is one of the conclusions of research by... More

THE ZERO LOWER BOUND: New evidence of its impact on uncertainty and economic activity

It is well known that the zero lower bound (ZLB) on the short-term nominal interest rate can have undesirable effects on the economy. New research by... More

THE POWER OF INDIRECT RECIPROCITY: Evidence from a natural field experiment on what drives human kindness in everyday interactions

We are twice as likely to cooperate and act generously towards strangers if we ourselves have been helped in a similar way. What’s more, it doesn’t... More

March 2016

HONEYMOON TO HANGOVER: Changing jobs does not guarantee long-run happiness

The boost in happiness from changing jobs is short-lived and relies on people having left their jobs willingly. These are among the findings of... More

THE HIDDEN COST OF GLOBALISATION: UK evidence that import competition leads to mental distress

The competition brought about by globalisation can hurt workers’ mental health. That is the central finding of research by Italo Colantone, Rosario... More

CHARITABLE BEHAVIOUR: UK evidence of the impact of the ‘big five’ personality traits

People’s donations of time and money to charities are strongly linked to their personalities. That is the main finding of research by Sarah Brown and... More

EUROPEAN COMMISSIONERS STILL BIASED TOWARDS THEIR HOMELANDS

Despite their claims of neutrality, Commissioners in the European Union (EU) tend to encourage spending on their home country. That is the central... More

MUMS-TO-BE AIM FOR SPRING AND SUMMER BIRTHS

Mothers explicitly target spring and summer when planning to give birth, according to research by Climent Quintana-Domeque and colleagues, to be... More

PUBLIC FUNDING FOR OLD-AGE CARE DISCOURAGES SAVINGS: Evidence from Scotland

People tend to save less for their old age when they believe the government will pay for part of their care. That is the central finding of research... More

STAY-AT-HOME MILLENNIALS: Young adults copy friends and live with parents

Peer pressure means that more people are living with their parents because their friends are happy to do the same. That is the central finding of... More

A WARMER PLANET LEADS TO HOTTER CONFLICTS

Climate change is increasingly becoming a cause of armed conflict. That is the central finding of research by Mehdi Shiva, to be presented at the... More

TIME FOR GROWTH: The big impact of public mechanical clocks on Europe's economic development 1200-1800

Public mechanical clocks, which were first introduced in European cities in the late thirteenth century, were one of the most important innovations in... More

TRANSPARENCY IN PARLIAMENT: Swiss evidence of the impact on MPs’ voting behaviour

Members of parliament are more likely to vote along party lines if their choices are made public. That is the central finding of research by Christine... More

SELF-EMPLOYMENT UNDERREPORTING IN GREAT BRITAIN: Who and how much?

Reducing evasion seems to be a priority for all revenue agencies, especially now when public finances are stretched. Self-employment income suffers... More

GLOBAL INEQUALITY FUELS REVOLUTION: New cross-national evidence of the economic origins of conflict

The further a country’s development falls behind the richest countries, the more likely it is to see protests and even revolutions. That is the... More

MASS MIGRATION FROM MEXICO TO THE UNITED STATES: New evidence of the impact of family background

High fertility and large family sizes do not in themselves constitute a significant push factor in the mass migration from Mexico to the United States... More

REFUGEES IN THE UK MUCH MORE LIKELY TO SEE THEMSELVES AS BRITISH THAN ECONOMIC MIGRANTS

Immigrants who have come to the UK as refugees or because of family ties are more than twice as likely to see themselves as having a British national... More

TAXING PEOPLE’S RUBBISH: Evidence from Switzerland that they don’t like it at first but learn to live with it

People might dislike taxes on their rubbish at first – but such taxes do encourage recycling and eventually become popular. That is the main finding... More

THE EUROSYSTEM’S EXPANDED ASSET PURCHASE PROGRAMME: New evidence of domestic and international macroeconomic effects

The Eurosystem’s expanded asset purchase programme will help lift inflation towards the European Central Bank’s target and boost economic activity in... More

MOBILE PHONES AMPLIFY POLITICAL UNREST IN TIMES OF CRISIS: Evidence from across Africa

The growing use of mobile phones in Africa leads to more political protests during recessions and periods of national crisis, according to research by... More

GENDER PAY GAP MAKES WOMEN LESS LIKELY TO MOVE FIRMS

Women are typically less mobile between employers because most of them earn less than their partners. But at the same time, firms take advantage of... More

WIND POWER IN THE UNITED STATES: ‘Green’ investment is less efficient

Many US wind farms are being built in the wrong place because their investors want to look environmentally conscious. That is the central finding of... More

HOUSE PRICES RISE BY UP TO 1.5% AFTER IMPROVED OFSTED SCORE, STUDY FINDS

Local house prices rise by as much as 1.5% in the immediate aftermath of an improved Ofsted score, according to a new study of 8,000 primary schools... More

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