Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

The deep roots of Rebellion: Evidence from the Irish Revolution

Census records from 1911 show that 19th-century famine might have inspired descendants to rebel The Great Irish Famine of 1845-1850 may have... More

SOCIAL NETWORKING: More time spent online makes children less happy with their lives

Children who spend more time social networking online feel less happy with a number of different aspects of their lives. That is the key finding of... More

ON THE CAUSES OF BREXIT: How migration from Eastern Europe contributed to the rise of UK Euroscepticism

Migration from Eastern Europe contributed to the growth of UK scepticism about the European Union (EU) as measured by electoral support for the UK... More

UNDERSTANDING THE NEXT HOUSING CRISIS: Housing risk will stabilise affordability if supply cannot, but it might take a price crash

High UK house prices increase the probability of a crash – and it's this factor which may make houses more affordable in the long run, according to... More

CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP FOR IMMIGRANT CHILDREN IN ITALY

Smart kids from outside Italy more likely to be held back at school and pushed into vocational education than natives – but this can be... More

March 2015

BIG PRODUCTIVITY LOSSES FROM OUTSIZED PUBLIC SECTORS IN RESOURCE-RICH COUNTRIES: New study of the resource curse

The puzzle that countries rich in natural resources often have worse economic outcomes than similar countries without the same resources may be due to... More

ILLEGAL DISCRIMINATION STILL SIGNIFICANT AND PERSISTENT: New survey of 70 studies over the last 15 years

If you are black, foreign, female, elderly, disabled, gay, obese or not a member of the dominant caste or religion in your community, you may face... More

CLICKS MEAN COVERAGE: How popularity drives the news

Readers’ interest in online news is driving the hard news agenda – but not by dumbing it down. That is the conclusion of new research into the... More

GENDER BIAS KEEPS MORTALITY RATES OF NEW MOTHERS HIGH

In countries where there are still strong prejudices against women, mortality rates of new mothers remain high despite the easy availability of... More

THE CRISIS OF TRUST IN SCIENCE: Evaluating solutions to the problem of false positives

Discouraging minor statistical sloppiness by scientists will reduce more severe questionable research practices such as outright data manipulation.... More

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS AND EARLY CAREER SUCCESS IN ECONOMICS: The impact of the academic publishing process

Talented researchers from less prominent institutions have to work harder and overcome larger hurdles to publish on a par with otherwise equivalent... More

BEHAVIOURAL BIAS IN EMPIRICAL RESEARCH: Evidence from top economics journals

There is a strong behavioural bias in empirical research, according to a new study by Yanos Zylberberg to be presented at the Royal Economic Society’s... More

THE ROLE OF CONFERENCES ON THE PATHWAY TO ACADEMIC IMPACT: Evidence from a natural experiment

Presenting an academic paper at a large conference can be expected to gain the authors 17-30 readers over the subsequent two years, and the effect is... More

THE BUSINESS CYCLES OF EUROZONE COUNTRIES: More out of sync now than before the single currency was launched

For at least 50 years, there has been no synchronisation of the business cycles of countries that are now members of the Eurozone. What’s more,... More

PERFORMANCE PAY: UK evidence of its impact on rising inequality

Performance pay was one factor behind the increase in wage inequality among higher earners in the run-up to the recession. That is the central finding... More

BUDGET CUTS WORSEN THE PUBLIC DEBT BURDEN WITH INTEREST RATES AT THE ZERO LOWER BOUND

Developed countries that are cutting their budgets in the aftermath of the global financial crisis are pushing themselves into deeper debt given that... More

RECESSIONS DAMAGES THE HEALTH OF YOUNG ADULTS: US evidence

Young people who start work during a recession are more likely to have health problems, according to research by Naijia Guo to be presented at the... More

INVESTING IN HIGHER EDUCATION GIVES A BIG GROWTH BOOST TO POOR COUNTRIES

Poor countries should pay much more attention to raising their skilled human capital, according to research by Fabio Cerina and Fabio Manca to be... More

WEEKEND OPENING OF GP SURGERIES CAN SOLVE A&E OVERLOAD

The crisis in Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments, with many stretched to breaking point, would be much less serious if patients had better... More

MORE PAWNSHOPS, MORE THEFT: US evidence

The wider availability of pawnshops leads to an increase in burglaries, according to research by Rocco d’Este to be presented at the Royal Economic... More

FINANCIAL LITERACY: The impact on political attitudes towards Scottish independence and UK membership of the European Union

People’s financial literacy – how well they understand the basics about inflation, interest rates and risk diversification – has a considerable impact... More

LIFETIME BENEFITS FOR CHILDREN CONCEIVED DURING HEATWAVES

Children conceived during heatwaves receive more schooling, are more literate and have lower rates of disability as adults, according to research by... More

UNEMPLOYMENT ‘SCARS’ FOR BRITAIN’S YOUNGER GENERATION FROM THE GREAT RECESSION

This study analyses the extent to which unemployment experiences negatively affect workers’ re-employability. The phenomenon, also known as the... More

WHEN TECHNOLOGY DESTROYS JOBS: Evidence from the adoption of electricity in the Great Depression

When firms adopt a new technology such as computers or electricity, what happens to employment? One side of the debate – the ‘technological... More

MEAGRE RETURNS TO WORK REDUCES GEOGRAPHICAL MOBILITY OF THE LOW SKILLED

UK university graduates are more than twice as likely to move region compared with non-graduates. This fact may appear puzzling, given the large... More

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