Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

June 2016

INTERNATIONAL TRADE BENEFITS THE RICH MORE THAN THE POOR

Because high-income consumers spend a relatively larger share of their income on services and manufactured goods, they benefit more from international... More

STUDYING ADVANCED MATHS BOOSTS GIRLS’ CAREER PROSPECTS

Girls shy away from courses in advanced mathematics at school – and this explains a substantial part of the underrepresentation of women in... More

THE UNDESIRABLE ECONOMIC AFTERMATH OF RESOURCE BOOMS: New evidence from the American West

Communities that enjoy well-paid jobs and low unemployment during a natural resources boom need to plan carefully for the serious economic hardships... More

WHEN HIGH INEQUALITY ATTRACTS HIGH-SKILLED IMMIGRANTS: New study of the drivers of brain drain and brain gain

A high level of income inequality potentially makes a country a more attractive destination for high-skilled workers migrating from other countries,... More

CHILDREN AS AN INVESTMENT: New evidence on the links between income, intergenerational transfers and parents’ fertility choices

Because parents can’t legally impose any debt obligations on their children for their upbringing, fertility rates are significantly lower than their... More

SELF-REINFORCING INEQUALITY: Experimental evidence that people’s beliefs about their relative ability limit their upward mobility

Experiencing disadvantage can make escaping disadvantage less likely because it leads people to believe that they are of lower relative ability and... More

ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION: Why we need policies inspired by the ‘polluter pays principle’

Polluters should be taxed for the impact of their pollution on society; and the victims of pollution should be fully compensated for the damages it... More

TRUST AND THE SIZE OF THE WELFARE STATE: A relationship with twin peaks among OECD countries

Large, corrupt and ineffective welfare states can survive in OECD countries, thanks to the support of a majority of people who are not civic-minded.... More

POOR PARENTS FOCUS RESOURCES ON THEIR MOST PROMISING OFFSPRING: Evidence from Tanzania

Parents with limited resources are more likely to invest in children who show signs of higher cognitive function early in life. That is the central... More

BOOKS ARE FOREVER: New cross-European evidence of the impact of childhood conditions on education and lifetime earnings

BOOKS ARE FOREVER: New cross-European evidence of the impact of childhood conditions on education and lifetime earnings Children who grow up around... More

May 2016

BOOKS ARE FOREVER: New cross-European evidence of the impact of childhood conditions on education and lifetime earnings

Children who grow up around books do better in later life. That is the central finding of research by Giorgio Brunello, Guglielmo Weber and Christoph... More

LOW-SKILLED WORKERS COULD BENEFIT FROM EXCHANGE RATE DEPRECIATION: Evidence from Swiss manufacturing firms

Low-skilled workers can profit from a fall in the exchange rate, according to research by Boris Kaiser and Michael Siegenthaler, published in the May... More

LIMITED HUMAN ATTENTION DRIVES RISKIER BEHAVIOUR: Evidence from World Cup alpine skiing

People typically focus on the left-most digit of a number and pay only partial attention to other digits – and in World Cup alpine ski events, this... More

PERSONALITY TRAITS AND WORKPLACE PRODUCTIVITY: Evidence from a laboratory experiment

Personality traits such as conscientiousness and neuroticism are significantly related to workers’ productivity, according to research by Ana... More

FINANCIAL MARKETS ARE MORE FORWARD-LOOKING THAN WE THOUGHT: New evidence from their behaviour around Fed policy decisions

Financial markets use Federal Reserve communications and macroeconomic indicators to adjust their behaviour much further in advance of the Fed’s... More

DO TAXES AFFECT HOW MUCH WE WORK?

How does labour supply respond to changes in wages and taxation? In his Sargan lecture to the Royal Economic Society, which is now published in the... More

ECONOMICS AND THE FAMILY: A happy marriage

What is family economics and how is it useful? Professor Pierre-Andre Chiappori gives his answer in this Royal Economic Society (RES) short film... More

FREE PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION: Evidence of the impact on child outcomes in primary school

The introduction of free part-time pre-school places for three year olds in England in the early 2000s led to small improvements in the children’s... More

CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF PERSISTENTLY LOW INTEREST RATES

Interest rates are at historic lows in advanced nations around the world and markets expect them to stay low for years. In his presidential address to... More

March 2016

WOMEN, WAGES AND HOUSEWORK: How closing the gender pay gap splits chores more evenly

Eliminating the gender gap in wages would lead to married women doing much less housework. That is one of the findings of research by Alexandros... More

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