Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

July 2016

HIGHER INCOME VOLATILITY HITS AMERICAN FAMILIES’ WELLBEING: Evidence from three decades to 2008

Increasingly large fluctuations in many American households’ incomes over the 30-year period up to the Great Recession led to a fall in overall family... More

INCREASED SCHOOL RESOURCES BOOST EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES OF LOWER-ABILITY PUPILS: Evidence from the Netherlands

Giving schools more resources – without putting specific restrictions on how they are spent – can have a positive impact on pupil outcomes. That is... More

TOWER OF BABEL: New research shows how and why we’re still a long way from everyone speaking the same language

Nearly a third of the world’s 6,000 plus distinct languages have more than 35,000 speakers. But despite the big communications advantages of a few... More

DRAFTING CONTRACTS, LAWS AND CONSTITUTIONS: The benefits of simplicity and vagueness

Analysing why some of America’s founding fathers opposed the inclusion of the Bill of Rights in the Constitution helps to explain why many modern-day... More

MIDLIFE CRISIS: Evidence that human wellbeing hits a low point in our early 40s

People’s life satisfaction follows a U-shape through the life cycle, gradually falling from early adulthood, reaching a minimum at around the ages of... More

MISERY OF WORK SECOND ONLY TO ILLNESS: UK evidence

British people are at their least happy while at work – except when they are sick in bed – according to a study forthcoming in the Economic... More

THE EFFECTS OF REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS: Forecasts may be underestimating productivity benefits

Modern techniques for evaluating the impact of regional trade agreements like the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)... More

WELFARE SPENDING DOESN’T ‘CROWD OUT’ CHARITABLE WORK: Historical evidence from England under the Poor Laws

Cutting the welfare budget is unlikely to lead to an increase in private voluntary work and charitable giving, according to research by Nina... More

WHEN INDUSTRIAL POLICY HARMS EXPORT PERFORMANCE: Evidence from the world steel industry

The use of industrial policies to support a country’s steel sector has damaging effects on the export competitiveness of downstream manufacturing... More

FRANCE’S NINETEENTH CENTURY WINE CRISIS: The impact on crime rates

The phylloxera crisis in nineteenth century France destroyed 40% of the country’s vineyards, devastating local economies. According to research by... More

GOLD HAS NEVER BEEN A GREAT HEDGE AGAINST BAD ECONOMIC TIMES: Evidence from decades of US and global data

Gold has not served very well as a hedge against bad macroeconomic and stock market outcomes. That is the central conclusion of research by Professors... More

TAKING ADVANTAGE OF UNINFORMED CONSUMERS: Evidence from 400 undercover taxi rides in Athens

If a taxi driver in an unfamiliar city knows that someone else is covering your fare, they are much more likely to charge you a higher price than is... More

GOLD MINING IN GHANA: New evidence of extensive damage to the environment, agriculture and living standards

The expansion of large-scale gold mining in Ghana has led to a big reduction in agricultural productivity and output – and a significant increase in... More

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: UK evidence of the impact of unemployment

Policies that enhance women’s job security could contribute to a reduction in domestic violence. That is one of the conclusions of a study by Dan... More

June 2016

CLASSROOMS THAT MIX AGE GROUPS HAVE MIXED RESULTS: Evidence from Norway of pupil achievement in ‘combination classes’

Children can benefit from being in classrooms that mix pupils from different age groups, but it depends crucially on the balance of lower and higher... More

CRIME’S BIG IMPACT ON LOCAL RESIDENTS’ MENTAL HEALTH

Living in parts of the UK where crime is rising causes considerable mental distress for residents, leading to anxiety and depression. A 20% increase... More

THE CAR ENGINE IMMOBILISER: Benefits of mandatory anti-theft device greatly exceed costs

Car theft rates have declined spectacularly as a result of the electronic engine immobiliser, an anti-theft device that the European Union (EU) made... More

THE NEED FOR ENEMIES: Why politicians seeking re-election might never quite complete their key task

History is littered with politicians elected ‘to get the job done’ who are then removed from office once they have delivered: think of Britain’s... More

INVESTING IN EDUCATION PROMOTES ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CENTURIES LATER: Evidence from a fourteenth century Dutch initiative

A fourteenth century educational revolution in the Netherlands gave a great boost to the early development of the Dutch economy, according to a study... More

POLITICAL ENTRENCHMENT: Why parties may adopt policies that hurt the interests of their core voters

There are certain circumstances in which an incumbent political party can increase its chances of re-election by implementing policies that harm its... More

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