Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

December 2016

FULL DISCLOSURE? New research of how best to organise contests

R&D, political campaigns, science competitions, job promotions and lobbying are often viewed as contests – and a key question for organisers of... More

LIBERAL EGALITARIANISM: New analysis of the implications of the ‘harm principle’ for redistributive policies

Classical liberalism and libertarianism do not provide a radical alternative to egalitarianism, according to research by Michele Lombardi, Kaname... More

VOCATIONAL TRAINING FOR THE UNEMPLOYED: Evidence from Turkey that the costs outweigh the benefits

Over the last decade the World Bank and its client governments have invested almost $1 billion a year in vocational training programmes for the... More

FAMILIES RESPOND TO HIGHER COSTS OF CHILDREN BY HAVING FEWER: Evidence from the Israeli kibbutz

Even something as personal as the choice of having another child can be heavily influenced by economic incentives. Analysing a unique social... More

GOLD MINING IN GHANA: New evidence of extensive damage to the environment, agriculture and living standards

The expansion of large-scale gold mining in Ghana has led to a big reduction in agricultural productivity and output – and a significant increase in... More

PRIMARY SEASON BOOSTS STATE ECONOMIES: Evidence from US presidential campaigns from 1974 to 2008

US presidential campaigns may be long and drawn out, but according to research by Rebecca Lessem and Carly Urban, they can bring considerable economic... More

POST-9/11 BACKLASH AGAINST MUSLIMS REDUCED ASSIMILATION

The increase in hate crimes against Muslim immigrants after the 9/11 terrorist attacks led to the targeted community retreating from assimilation and... More

HIGHER INCOME VOLATILITY HITS AMERICAN FAMILIES’ WELLBEING: Evidence from three decades to 2008

Increasingly large fluctuations in many American households’ incomes over the 30-year period up to the Great Recession led to a fall in overall family... More

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: UK evidence of the impact of unemployment

Policies that enhance women’s job security could contribute to a reduction in domestic violence. That is one of the conclusions of a study by Dan... More

MORE TIME WITH MUM IS BEST FOR KIDS’ EARLY DEVELOPMENT: New evidence from the UK cohort born in the early 2000s

The more time a mother spends with her child between the ages of three and seven, the better that child’s cognitive and social skills will be,... More

EARLY CHILDHOOD INTERVENTIONS TO PREVENT DISEASE AND PROMOTE HEALTH: Evidence from two influential US programmes

New research analyses the long-term impacts on healthy behaviours and adult health of two of the oldest and most influential early childhood... More

INCREASING PARENTS’ EDUCATION IMPROVES EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS: Evidence from raising the school leaving age

Increasing the minimum school leaving age had a positive effect on the educational attainment of future generations, according to research published... More

COST-EFFECTIVE PROGRAMMES TO PROMOTE CHILDREN’S DEVELOPMENT: New US evidence

Conditional cash transfers, in which parents receive payment only after their child’s development has satisfied some performance criteria, are the... More

November 2016

HIGH COSTS OF MISMATCH BETWEEN WORKERS AND JOBS: Lessons from economic research

Instead of worrying about unemployment as the main challenge for modern labour markets, we should consider more carefully the problems of mismatch of... More

October 2016

CHILDREN DO NOT BEHAVE LIKE ADULTS: New evidence on gender gaps in performance and risk-taking from TV game shows

While pre-teen girls and boys are equally willing to take risks in high-stakes situations, adult women have less of an appetite for risk than men. But... More

THE INTERGENERATIONAL WELFARE STATE: New thinking on a social compact to encourage greater investment in education

A new social compact can drive higher investments in human capital for the benefit of society as a whole without any generation needing to sacrifice.... More

RANDOMISED POLICY EXPERIMENTS: How to avoid biased predictions from how subjects are allocated into treatment and control groups

Even credible and explicit procedures for allocating people into ‘treatment’ and ‘control’ groups in randomised policy experiments do not guarantee an... More

ENDGAME BEHAVIOUR: New evidence of how people act towards others when they know the slate can be wiped clean

A mobile society in which people can sometimes start over with a clean slate need not be fatal to cooperative and trustworthy behaviour. That is the... More

INADEQUATE SAVING: Age dependence of people’s ability to impose ‘self- control’ implies that the young need more government incentives to save for retirement

People’s ability to focus on long-term goals is stronger in later adulthood than earlier in their lives. Moreover, this improvement in ‘self-control’... More

THE IMPACT OF SCHOOL STARTING AGE ON TEENAGE CRIMINALITY: Evidence from Denmark

Children who start school at a younger age are more likely to commit crimes before they reach their early twenties. Parents who enrol their offspring... More

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