Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

The deep roots of Rebellion: Evidence from the Irish Revolution

Census records from 1911 show that 19th-century famine might have inspired descendants to rebel The Great Irish Famine of 1845-1850 may have... More

SOCIAL NETWORKING: More time spent online makes children less happy with their lives

Children who spend more time social networking online feel less happy with a number of different aspects of their lives. That is the key finding of... More

ON THE CAUSES OF BREXIT: How migration from Eastern Europe contributed to the rise of UK Euroscepticism

Migration from Eastern Europe contributed to the growth of UK scepticism about the European Union (EU) as measured by electoral support for the UK... More

UNDERSTANDING THE NEXT HOUSING CRISIS: Housing risk will stabilise affordability if supply cannot, but it might take a price crash

High UK house prices increase the probability of a crash – and it's this factor which may make houses more affordable in the long run, according to... More

CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP FOR IMMIGRANT CHILDREN IN ITALY

Smart kids from outside Italy more likely to be held back at school and pushed into vocational education than natives – but this can be... More

March 2016

DID GOING TO COLLEGE HELP MICHAEL CORLEONE? New evidence of the benefits of education for ‘business criminals’

A mobster who completes just one extra year of education can increase, on average, his earnings by around 8%, according to a new study of the... More

YOUR LANGUAGE OR MINE? Bilingualism brings communities together

Bilingualism helps to break down barriers even when basic communication was never a problem, leading to higher rates of intermarriage between people... More

MORE EDUCATION WON’T NECESSARILY MAKE YOU RICHER: New evidence from the 1972 increase in the UK’s school leaving age

New research questions the commonly held belief that more education is necessarily ‘good for you’ and will result in higher wages and better life... More

PARENTING AND SOCIAL MOBILITY: How pre-school attention shapes society

The time that parents invest in their children when they’re pre-school explains almost half the low intergenerational mobility in the United States.... More

NEVER PUT OFF TILL TOMORROW WHAT YOU CAN DO TODAY: New insights on procrastination

Procrastinators are more likely to get around to onerous activities that they’d prefer to avoid when they have a buddy to do them with. They’re also... More

‘TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN’: The impact of Betfair’s ‘cash-out’ facility on betting behaviour

People who bet on football are far more likely to ‘cash out’ their bets – rather than holding them until the end of the game – if they are trading at... More

‘WE ARE IN A DEEP TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION, NOT SECULAR STAGNATION’: Ignoring this is the major risk for central bankers today

The world is undergoing a ‘deep technological revolution’ (DTR) and not a secular stagnation – and since 2009, it has fortunately done so in a context... More

EUROPEAN MONETARY POLICY IN CRISIS TIMES: New evidence on the interest rate channel

The interest rate channel through which monetary policy is transmitted to the wider economy never entirely broke down, even at the height of the... More

THE GREAT RECESSION AND THE UK LABOUR MARKET: New evidence of the employment benefits of wage flexibility

The rise in unemployment following the Great Recession would have been larger had wage-setting in the UK been less flexible. That is the central... More

THE IMPACT OF SYSTEMIC FINANCIAL STRESS ON THE REAL ECONOMY: New evidence for Europe

Real economic stress lasts on average six months longer when it is associated with financial market stress. What’s more, the decline in GDP is on... More

GOVERNMENT SPENDING EFFECTS ON EMPLOYMENT AND HOUSEHOLD INCOMES: New US evidence

Defence spending – and perhaps government spending more generally – may not be a useful way to boost employment at the national level. That is one of... More

CAPITAL CONTROLS IN EMERGING MARKET ECONOMIES: Ineffective for macroeconomic management and with potentially damaging side-effects

Capital controls imposed by emerging market economies are ineffective for macroeconomic management and may have stronger international spillovers than... More

THE HIGH HEALTHCARE COSTS OF POLLUTION: Evidence from a volcano in Hawaii

Sulphur dioxide pollution from a Hawaiian volcano has caused over $6 million of healthcare costs since 2008, according to research by Timothy... More

GLOBAL TRADE IN SERVICES IS CONSTRAINED BY BORDER BARRIERS

New research reveals that international trade in services faces significant border barriers. The study by James Anderson, Ingo Borchert, Aaditya... More

STRICTER PRODUCT STANDARDS ARE GOOD FOR TRADE: Evidence from pesticides in agricultural products

Stricter standards to make products safer for consumers can encourage international trade, regardless of who imposes them. That is the central finding... More

INDIA’S MISSING OLDER WOMEN: New evidence of unequal treatment within the family

Indian women over the age of 45 die at a disproportionately higher rate than men their age, according to research by Rossella Calvi, to be presented... More

LATER MARRIAGES PLAYED A KEY ROLE IN EUROPE’S HISTORIC GROWTH TAKE-OFF

Western Europe experienced the earliest modern economic growth and also had a uniquely high female age at first marriage – around 25 – from at the... More

PROPERTY RIGHTS IN LAND: Key to the processes of urbanisation and growth in developing countries

Land policies that reduce the cost of establishing formal ownership or protect informal dwellers against evictions can stimulate productivity in... More

DEEP HISTORICAL ROOTS OF MODERN INEQUALITY: How the Reconquista still shapes Spain’s economy

The Christian Kingdoms’ Reconquest of Spain between the eight and fifteenth centuries set in motion processes that generated persistent inequality,... More

MALARIA SHAPED AFRICA’S DEVELOPMENT

Malaria has played a key role in the development of sub-Saharan Africa, according to research by Matthias Flückiger and Markus Ludwig, to be presented... More

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