Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

April 2017

SUPPORTING VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: An innovative and effective intervention in the UK

Quickly assigning a ‘victim engagement worker’ to help people who are experiencing domestic violence has increased reported satisfaction with how the... More

THE SKILL PREMIUM AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN THE VERY LONG RUN, 1300-1914

The skill premium – the wage of skilled labour relative to the wage of unskilled labour – will tend to remain stable at its current level of 58%,... More

E-GOVERNMENT IS GOOD FOR BUSINESS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

New electronic systems need institutional support – but they can cut red tape and bribery Electronic government systems (e-government) cut the cost to... More

IMPROVING WOMEN’S HEALTH HAS IMPROVED THEIR EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES: Medical advances have eradicated the gender gap in schooling

Vaccination and antibiotics were mostly responsible for closing the gender gap in education, according to a study by Mariko Klasing and Petros... More

POLARISED SOCIAL VALUES RESTRICT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from across Europe

Greater polarisation in values and attitudes harms economic activity across Europe, according to research by Sjoerd Beugelsdijk, Mariko Klasing and... More

FOR A BETTER LIFE IN AFRICA, MOVE TO A CITY

Almost every measure of living standards in Africa is better in urban areas – even air pollution The flight to cities in Africa gets migrants a better... More

GERMAN SINGLES HIT BY GLOBALISATION SUFFERED MORE THAN COUPLES

Most couples work in different industries – and so one partner's gains from globalisation often offset another’s loss Being married or cohabiting has... More

TIME TO DUMP OLD SCHOOL TEACHING? Spanish evidence that school test results improve with modern methods, especially for girls

Schools that involve students in discussions and presentations, rather than rote learning, are getting much better test results, according to research... More

THE GEEKS HAVE INHERITED THE EARTH: STEM knowledge needed to apply for one in six non-techie jobs in the UK

Half a million jobs in traditionally non-techie subjects every year are now asking for knowledge of science, technology, engineering and maths – known... More

APPLYING TO UNIVERSITY: It's not just about how smart you are

Risk-averse students who lack parental interest less likely to try for a degree Family support and attitudes to risk have almost as big an influence... More

MANY PARENTS INVEST TIME IN THEIR KIDS TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE: Evidence of widespread mistaken beliefs about the impact of time investments

Many parents believe that the time they spend with their kids is more valuable the older they are, and that investing time later isn't as useful if... More

A POWERPOINT PREMIUM? Evidence that men earn more for the same job because they present, negotiate and use spreadsheets more often

Half of the unexplained gender wage gap, which means that women are paid less than men even when they are ostensibly doing the same jobs, is because... More

USING DATA FROM GOOGLE SEARCHES TO PREDICT CAR SALES: Evidence for Germany and the UK

Companies that want to forecast future sales of their products can use internet search to predict trends, according to research by Georg von... More

HOUSEHOLD ‘CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER’: Strength of character as much as ability decides who makes the money decisions, especially for older people

We are more likely to be the household’s financial whizz if we are more conscientious and less agreeable, according to a study by Olga Goldfayn-Frank,... More

NORTH-SOUTH DIVIDE: Experimental evidence that Italians share less generously with people from the other half of the country

More than 150 years after the country’s unification, southerners and northerners in Italy still find it hard to cooperate with each other, according... More

USING THE MEDIA TO DISCOURAGE TAX-DODGING: Evidence from Milan of the effectiveness of a well-publicised audit ‘blitz’

Publicising tax audits is a low cost way to curtail tax evasion, according to research conducted in Italy by Simona Gamba and colleagues, to be... More

SPECIALIST INVESTMENT FUNDS ARE NOT THAT SPECIAL: They own the same shares as other funds and don’t perform better

You might expect specialist investment funds to have a different portfolio to other funds and to use their expertise to achieve higher returns. But... More

CAREGIVING SUBSIDIES SUPPORT FAMILIES: Spanish voucher system influenced the type of care that the elderly chose

Spanish subsidies for caregiving inspired a massive shift from community to home care for the elderly, according to research by Joan Costa-Font, Sergi... More

GLOBALISATION HAS CHANGED THE WAY THAT INDIAN PEOPLE EAT: New evidence of the impact of trade on diet

The rise in international trade has changed the diet of Indian people, increasing the amount of animal products they eat. That is the central finding... More

LONDON’S TEACHERS DESERT PROFESSION WHEN JOBS ELSEWHERE PAY BETTER: New evidence of the impact of ‘outside options’

The government could be picking up a £31 million bill to train replacements for teachers who leave when pay in other sectors rises, according to... More

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