Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

May 2017

THE IMPACT OF GENDER STEREOTYPES ON BEHAVIOUR: Experimental evidence from a ‘beauty contest’ game

Gender stereotypes can influence men and women’s behaviour to be more competitive or empathic. That is the central finding of experimental research by... More

REDUCING INCOME INEQUALITY WITH TAXES: A double-edged sword

Using tax changes to reduce income inequality is a double-edged sword, according to research by Siddhartha Biswas, Indraneel Chakraborty and Rong Hai,... More

April 2017

WAS KEYNES A ‘KEY PLAYER’? Social network analysis of the Bloomsbury Group

What did social networks look like 100 years ago? Was Keynes a ‘Key Player’ in his own Bloomsbury Group network of intellectuals and artists? In an... More

EUROPE’S BIGGEST ONLINE MARKET FOR USED CARS: Evidence from Germany of ‘price discontinuities’

Participants in Europe’s biggest online market for cars put too much weight on the registration year of a vehicle and partly ignore the valuable... More

BENEFITS OF BEING BILINGUAL: Immigrant kids with two languages perform better in maths and reading by age seven

Bilingual children outperform their monolingual peers in mathematics and writing by the time they reach seven, according to a University of Sydney... More

FASTER INTERNET CONNECTIONS BOOST VOTER TURNOUT: Evidence from a local broadband policy in Italy

A 2013 upgrade of the broadband infrastructure in the province of Trento in Italy led to a significant rise in local voter turnout in the next... More

TREATING MATERNAL DEPRESSION: Evidence of the impact on mental health, parenting, financial autonomy and child development

Providing cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to women in rural Pakistan who were suffering from perinatal depression has had persistent positive... More

INVESTMENT IN NEW ROAD INFRASTRUCTURE: Evidence of some economic benefits at least for local areas

New investment in roads can produce economic benefits, even in mature infrastructure networks like the UK’s, according to research by Professor Henry... More

THE BEST VERSUS THE REST: Global productivity slowdown hides an increasing performance gap across firms

The very strong labour productivity performance of the best firms in the world has been accompanied by a large and growing productivity gap between... More

MANAGING THE UK NATIONAL DEBT, 1694-2016

Despite having increased substantially since the financial crisis, the face value of UK government debt is currently below its average value for the... More

THE RESEARCH EXCELLENCE FRAMEWORK: Evidence of its role in driving pay inequality among UK academics

There is a clear link between professors’ pay and Research Excellence Framework performance, with departments that pay higher salaries achieving... More

THE HEALTH AND HUMAN CAPITAL OF WAR REFUGEES: Evidence from Jewish migrants escaping the Nazis 1940-42

Late refugees from Nazi-dominated Europe were in better health and had higher levels of education compared with the populations in their countries of... More

FINANCIAL OPENNESS REDUCES POVERTY HEADCOUNT IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIESS

Increased capital account openness is good for a nation’s poor – even though foreign investment may increase numbers in poverty When governments ease... More

OIL AND GAS DISCOVERIES KICKSTART FOREIGN INVESTMENT BONANZA

‘Resource blessing’ as expectations of growth bring outside investors to developing countries Countries that announce natural resource discoveries... More

TEXT ANALYSIS LAYS BARE ANIMAL SPIRITS

Broker reports and financial news contain useful information in shifting sentiment Text analysis of broker and news reports can predict swings in... More

WHY WAR VETERANS HARM THEIR WIVES: A novel explanation from post-war Angola

Soldiers exposed to sexual violence in war more likely to be violent to wives Soldiers in Angola who were exposed to situations of sexual violence... More

RETAINING HIGH-SKILLED PERSONNEL IN PUBLIC SERVICE: Evidence from the Royal and US Navies

UK and US records show that abandoning specialisation gave naval officers fewer outside options and kept them in the service Rapidly modernising... More

SMARTER FRIENDS WON’T HELP YOUR GRADES, BUT SMARTER CLASSMATES WILL

Peer effects are positive in task-oriented groups, but the opposite is true in broad social settings The effects of high-performing peers on student... More

LITTLE EVIDENCE FOR THE MADNESS OF CROWDS Our social interactions are informative of our investment decisions

When we’re investing, we don’t mindlessly copy our peers, according to new research by Luc Arrondel, Hector Calvo Pardo, Chryssi Giannitsarou and... More

The deep roots of Rebellion: Evidence from the Irish Revolution

Census records from 1911 show that 19th-century famine might have inspired descendants to rebel The Great Irish Famine of 1845-1850 may have... More

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