Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

January 2017

MISERY OF WORK SECOND ONLY TO ILLNESS: UK evidence

British people are at their least happy while at work – except when they are sick in bed – according to a study published in the February 2017 issue... More

WELFARE SPENDING DOESN’T ‘CROWD OUT’ CHARITABLE WORK: Historical evidence from England under the Poor Laws

Cutting the welfare budget is unlikely to lead to an increase in private voluntary work and charitable giving, according to research by Nina... More

TAKING ADVANTAGE OF UNINFORMED CONSUMERS: Evidence from 400 undercover taxi rides in Athens

If a taxi driver in an unfamiliar city knows that someone else is covering your fare, they are much more likely to charge you a higher price than is... More

FRANCE’S NINETEENTH CENTURY WINE CRISIS: The impact on crime rates

The phylloxera crisis in nineteenth century France destroyed 40% of the country’s vineyards, devastating local economies. According to research by... More

TOWER OF BABEL: New research shows how and why we’re still a long way from everyone speaking the same language

Nearly a third of the world’s 6,000 plus distinct languages have more than 35,000 speakers. But despite the big communications advantages of a few... More

TWO-WAY CAPITAL FLOWS BETWEEN CHINA AND THE UNITED STATES: New evidence of the impact of China’s underdeveloped financial markets

Underdeveloped financial markets and rapid economic growth are the most important forces driving China's massive outflows of financial capital and... More

INCREASED SCHOOL RESOURCES BOOST EDUCATIONAL OUTCOMES OF LOWER-ABILITY PUPILS: Evidence from the Netherlands

Giving schools more resources – without putting specific restrictions on how they are spent – can have a positive impact on pupil outcomes. That is... More

HEALTH INSURANCE: Why healthy people have high coverage and those most at risk don’t

A serious problem in countries with private health insurance is that some people get under-insured or have no insurance at all. This under-insurance... More

MIDLIFE CRISIS: Evidence that human wellbeing hits a low point in our early 40s

People’s life satisfaction follows a U-shape through the life cycle, gradually falling from early adulthood, reaching a minimum at around the ages of... More

RESOURCE BOOMS CAN BENEFIT THE WIDER ECONOMY: Evidence from mineral-abundant Australia and oil-rich Norway

A natural resource boom in a country can have positive effects on non-resource industries, according to research by Hilde C. Bjørnland and Leif Anders... More

FOR LOVE OR REWARD? Experimental evidence on the economics of gift-giving to parents by their adult children

Gifts to elderly parents from their adult children are often motivated by the latter’s expectations of what they may receive in return. That is the... More

WHY MARKETS FOR HOUSES ARE MORE SEASONAL THAN MARKETS FOR APARTMENTS: Evidence from Norway

Differences in the process of matching buyers to properties in the markets for houses and apartments lead to significant differences in the... More

A LANDSCAPE THAT COLUMBUS WOULD RECOGNISE: New research explores whether today’s patterns of wealth and poverty were already determined by 1492

Efforts to change the geography of economic activity face centuries-old forces working against them, according to research by economists William... More

WIDENING CORPORATE BOND SPREADS ARE A GOOD EARLY WARNING OF RECESSION: New evidence for European economies

New research finds that corporate bond spreads – the difference in yields between a risky corporate bond and a low-risk government bond – have... More

DISCOUNTED TUITION FEES CAN REDUCE CLASS ATTENDANCE: Evidence of the ‘sunk-cost effect’ among Dutch university students

University students who received a surprise discount on their fees for voluntary extra-curricular tutorials responded by being less likely to show up... More

THE HIDDEN COSTS OF DOWNSIZING: Experimental evidence of the potential damage to the performance of surviving staff

Firms that lay off staff can see a significant reduction in the performance of their remaining workers, according to an experimental study by Frank... More

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