Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

COMPETITION PROTECTS NEW PARENTS FROM RIP-OFF PHARMACIES: Italian evidence

Pharmacists in small Italian cities where they are effectively monopolies will jack up the prices of products desperately needed by hard-pressed... More

‘HARMLESS’ CHEATING IN THE LAB LINKED TO MISBEHAVIOUR IN REAL LIFE

Breaking the rules. Almost daily we hear about someone who has cheated to get ahead – students using a study app to get answers for a final exam; two... More

SOCIAL DIVISIONS: India’s caste system as an exemplar of why members of different groups refuse to interact

Social divisions – such as the divisions between ‘tribes’ or ‘clans’ in developing countries, or the divisions between racial or religious groups in... More

EFFECTS OF COAL-BASED AIR POLLUTION ON MORTALITY RATES: New evidence from nineteenth century Britain

Industrialised cities in mid-nineteenth century Britain probably suffered from similar levels of air pollution as urban centres in China and India do... More

HOW CIVIL CONFLICT DISRUPTS THE ECONOMY: New evidence from the West Bank and Gaza

Conflict in Palestine in the early 2000s had a devastating effect on the economy, largely because local manufacturing firms were unable to get access... More

May 2018

ACCESS TO CITIZENSHIP PROMOTES IMMIGRANTS’ ECONOMIC ASSIMILATION

Reforms in Germany that allowed some immigrants to naturalise up to eight years faster than others boosted their economic and social assimilation.... More

EFFECTS OF COAL-BASED AIR POLLUTION ON MORTALITY RATES: New evidence from nineteenth century Britain

Industrialised cities in mid-nineteenth century Britain probably suffered from similar levels of air pollution as urban centres in China and India do... More

GETTING UNEMPLOYED YOUTH INTO WORK: Evidence from Ethiopia on the effectiveness of transport subsidies

Unemployed youth in urban Ethiopia who are provided with transport subsidies increase the intensity with which they look for work and are more likely... More

THE IMPACT OF THE FIRST WOMEN JURORS ON COURTROOM DECISIONS

The addition of women to juries in England in the early twentieth century had a significant impact on conviction rates, particularly for cases in... More

‘HARMLESS’ CHEATING IN THE LAB LINKED TO MISBEHAVIOUR IN REAL LIFE

Breaking the rules. Almost daily we hear about someone who has cheated to get ahead – students using a study app to get answers for a final exam; two... More

ALL ROADS LEAD TO AMERICA: New evidence on transit migration

Blocking direct migration from developing countries to high-income countries, such as the United States, might have many unintended and unforeseen... More

COMPETITION IN THE MARKET FOR LUXURY GOODS WASTES RESOURCES

When the goal of luxury purchases is to signal their buyers’ incomes – ‘conspicuous consumption’ – then a monopoly will deliver those signals... More

BOOSTING PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH VIA IMMIGRATION: New evidence of the impact of migrants as drivers of knowledge diffusion

International migration, particularly of skilled people, is an important influence on the diffusion of knowledge across national borders, promoting... More

HIGH-SPEED RAIL BOOSTS CORPORATE PROFITS BUT CENTRALISES JOBS IN BIG CITIES: Evidence from France

The improvement in communications made possible by high-speed rail in France has slightly increased the profit margins of big firms with many sites... More

ACADEMIC PAPERS LOST IN THE STORM: How Hurricane Isaac led to reduced research collaboration and hence poorer science

When economists and other scientists attend conferences like the annual gathering of the Royal Economic Society, they are more likely to create... More

BIG SUPERMARKETS CAN’T ALWAYS SQUEEZE SMALL SUPPLIERS: Evidence from Chilean coffee suppliers

Small suppliers bargaining with large supermarket chains are not necessarily doomed to earn meagre profits. That is the central finding of research by... More

NUDGING LONG-TERM ABSENTEES BACK TO WORK: Evidence from Norway of a highly effective, policy intervention for sick-listed workers

New research shows that a small ‘nudge’ – in the form of a compulsory ‘dialogue meeting’ for workers who are off sick for long periods – can be enough... More

THE IMPACT OF MALARIA ON EARLY AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from the sickle cell trait

While malaria historically claimed millions of African lives, it did not hold back the continent’s economic development. That is one of the findings... More

A POSSIBLE DOWNSIDE OF ‘NUDGE’ POLICIES: People may come to rely on default options too much

The popularity of ‘nudge’ policies, which use people’s psychological biases to steer them towards better choice, has a potential side... More

ECONOMICS OF MELTING ICECAPS: Big shift in world trade patterns expected as the Northern Sea Route becomes commercially viable

The opening of the Northern Sea Route for high volume commercial traffic through the Arctic Ocean, which is becoming possible as a consequence of... More

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: A North-South perspective on patent protection and compulsory licensing

How can developing countries get access to patented pharmaceuticals and other products at reasonable prices if they are required under World Trade... More

March 2018

LARGE-SCALE ECONOMETRIC MODELS: Do they have a future?

At the Royal Economic Society’s 2018 annual conference at the University of Sussex, Professor Roger Farmer organised a special session on the future... More

PRODUCTIVITY PUZZLES PAST AND PRESENT: NIESR’s 80th anniversary special session

Productivity weakness has become one of the most striking characteristics of the UK’s recent economic performance. Output per hour worked, which grew... More

EXCEPTIONAL STAFF COMMITMENT HELPS BOOST SCHOOL PERFORMANCE: UK evidence

School employees in the UK are more committed to their organisations than employees of organisations elsewhere in the economy, according to a new... More

ANTIBIOTICS BOOSTED WOMEN’S CAREERS: Evidence from 20th century America

Declines in child mortality due to the invention of the first antibiotics caused American women to delay their fertility and increase their labour... More

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