Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

IMPACT OF LIFTING ALCOHOL RESTRICTIONS ON VIOLENT CRIME: Evidence from Kansas

Lifting or loosening restrictions on alcohol sales could lead to substantial increases in violent crime, according to research by Daniel Rees,... More

LOTTERY WINNERS CUT THEIR WORKING HOURS BUT DON’T LEAVE EMPLOYMENT: New evidence from the Netherlands

People who win big prizes in the lottery tend to work fewer hours but they don’t withdraw completely from the labour market. These are the central... More

TOWARDS EQUALITY OF OPPORTUNITY: New economic analysis

Any social arrangement in which just one person has no opportunities is the worst possible outcome. That is one of the conclusions of research by... More

THE ZERO LOWER BOUND: New evidence of its impact on uncertainty and economic activity

It is well known that the zero lower bound (ZLB) on the short-term nominal interest rate can have undesirable effects on the economy. New research by... More

THE POWER OF INDIRECT RECIPROCITY: Evidence from a natural field experiment on what drives human kindness in everyday interactions

We are twice as likely to cooperate and act generously towards strangers if we ourselves have been helped in a similar way. What’s more, it doesn’t... More

May 2018

HIGH-SPEED RAIL BOOSTS CORPORATE PROFITS BUT CENTRALISES JOBS IN BIG CITIES: Evidence from France

The improvement in communications made possible by high-speed rail in France has slightly increased the profit margins of big firms with many sites... More

ACADEMIC PAPERS LOST IN THE STORM: How Hurricane Isaac led to reduced research collaboration and hence poorer science

When economists and other scientists attend conferences like the annual gathering of the Royal Economic Society, they are more likely to create... More

BIG SUPERMARKETS CAN’T ALWAYS SQUEEZE SMALL SUPPLIERS: Evidence from Chilean coffee suppliers

Small suppliers bargaining with large supermarket chains are not necessarily doomed to earn meagre profits. That is the central finding of research by... More

NUDGING LONG-TERM ABSENTEES BACK TO WORK: Evidence from Norway of a highly effective, policy intervention for sick-listed workers

New research shows that a small ‘nudge’ – in the form of a compulsory ‘dialogue meeting’ for workers who are off sick for long periods – can be enough... More

THE IMPACT OF MALARIA ON EARLY AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from the sickle cell trait

While malaria historically claimed millions of African lives, it did not hold back the continent’s economic development. That is one of the findings... More

A POSSIBLE DOWNSIDE OF ‘NUDGE’ POLICIES: People may come to rely on default options too much

The popularity of ‘nudge’ policies, which use people’s psychological biases to steer them towards better choice, has a potential side... More

ECONOMICS OF MELTING ICECAPS: Big shift in world trade patterns expected as the Northern Sea Route becomes commercially viable

The opening of the Northern Sea Route for high volume commercial traffic through the Arctic Ocean, which is becoming possible as a consequence of... More

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: A North-South perspective on patent protection and compulsory licensing

How can developing countries get access to patented pharmaceuticals and other products at reasonable prices if they are required under World Trade... More

March 2018

LARGE-SCALE ECONOMETRIC MODELS: Do they have a future?

At the Royal Economic Society’s 2018 annual conference at the University of Sussex, Professor Roger Farmer organised a special session on the future... More

PRODUCTIVITY PUZZLES PAST AND PRESENT: NIESR’s 80th anniversary special session

Productivity weakness has become one of the most striking characteristics of the UK’s recent economic performance. Output per hour worked, which grew... More

EXCEPTIONAL STAFF COMMITMENT HELPS BOOST SCHOOL PERFORMANCE: UK evidence

School employees in the UK are more committed to their organisations than employees of organisations elsewhere in the economy, according to a new... More

ANTIBIOTICS BOOSTED WOMEN’S CAREERS: Evidence from 20th century America

Declines in child mortality due to the invention of the first antibiotics caused American women to delay their fertility and increase their labour... More

POLITICAL LENDING CYCLES: How banks in Turkey support the ruling party

Governments may use commercial bank lending to support allies and punish opponents in local elections, according to research by Çağatay Bircan and... More

MAKING SURE CHARITABLE DONATIONS ARE PUT TO GOOD USE

For efficient use of foreign aid, it should be provided to developing countries through a mixture of discretionary transfers and structural projects.... More

MEDIEVAL ORIGINS OF SPAIN’S ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

The frontier of medieval warfare between Christian and Muslim armies in southern Spain provides a surprisingly powerful explanation of current... More

ADVANTAGES OF EMPLOYER-SPONSORED IMMIGRATION: Evidence from Australia

Employer-sponsored immigration schemes are more effective than a points-based system in sending workers to regions where they’re needed most. That is... More

SPEAKING TO THE MASSES ABOUT MONETARY POLICY: New evidence on central bank communications

The UK public’s understanding of monetary policy structures appears to have been largely immune to the Bank of England’s communication revolution:... More

THE EUROPEAN REFUGEE CRISIS AND HOUSE PRICES: UK evidence

The value of lower priced and lower quality housing tends to fall relative to higher priced and higher quality units in response to an increase in... More

SCIENTISTS PENALISED BY MOTHERHOOD: Evidence from Italian universities

Female academics with young children find it more difficult to access research funding and generate attention for their results than their male... More

PAST PROJECT FAILURE IMPROVES WORKERS’ PRODUCTIVITY: Experimental evidence

Hearing about past organisational failure acts as a productivity boost for workers, according to research by Sabrina Jeworrek, Vanessa Mertins and... More

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