Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

The deep roots of Rebellion: Evidence from the Irish Revolution

Census records from 1911 show that 19th-century famine might have inspired descendants to rebel The Great Irish Famine of 1845-1850 may have... More

SOCIAL NETWORKING: More time spent online makes children less happy with their lives

Children who spend more time social networking online feel less happy with a number of different aspects of their lives. That is the key finding of... More

ON THE CAUSES OF BREXIT: How migration from Eastern Europe contributed to the rise of UK Euroscepticism

Migration from Eastern Europe contributed to the growth of UK scepticism about the European Union (EU) as measured by electoral support for the UK... More

UNDERSTANDING THE NEXT HOUSING CRISIS: Housing risk will stabilise affordability if supply cannot, but it might take a price crash

High UK house prices increase the probability of a crash – and it's this factor which may make houses more affordable in the long run, according to... More

CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP FOR IMMIGRANT CHILDREN IN ITALY

Smart kids from outside Italy more likely to be held back at school and pushed into vocational education than natives – but this can be... More

August 2017

THE BENEFITS OF RISKY SCIENCE: No news can be good news for scientific progress

Research by Professor Michael Mandler argues that scientific progress can accelerate when scientists are less than fully informed about the advances... More

ATTRACTING HIGH-PAYING JOBS TO A LOCAL ECONOMY BOOST WAGES FOR EVERYONE: New evidence from Germany of the potential of industrial policy

Attracting a high-paying industry to a region leads to higher wages across all industries in the local economy. That is the central message of... More

WAGE INEQUALITY IN SPAIN: New evidence of the impact of boom and bust in the housing market

Rises and falls in the demand for construction workers have had a big impact on earnings inequality in Spain, according to new research by Stéphane... More

SOCIAL NETWORKS THAT DRIVE INEQUALITY AND GROWTH: New economic analysis

Differences in the structure of social networks can have significant implications for people’s accumulation of human capital for themselves and their... More

SOCIAL NETWORKS THAT DRIVE INEQUALITY AND GROWTH: New economic analysis

Differences in the structure of social networks can have significant implications for people’s accumulation of human capital for themselves and their... More

MIDDLE CLASS ACTIVISM: Why it’s rarely the most disadvantaged who drive political change

It is a longstanding puzzle that the middle classes rather than the poor typically cause political ferment and spearhead mass movements against the... More

DISCRIMINATION IN THE LABOUR MARKET: The curse of competition between workers from different groups

Discrimination by employers against particular groups of workers, whether based on gender, ethnicity or some other characteristic, becomes more... More

SELECTIVE SCHOOL SYSTEMS: Evidence from Germany and implications for the UK debate about grammar schools

Germany has a seemingly rigorous selective education system that ‘tracks’ children into three different school types based on ability at the age of... More

ANNUITIES LESS ATTRACTIVE IN CASE OF POTENTIAL HEALTH COSTS: New evidence on how to allocate pension wealth on retirement

Many people at or nearing retirement require much better advice on what to do with their pension savings. In many countries, they need to think... More

INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT IN AFRICA: Lessons from colonial times for today’s big network modernisation projects

Colonial investments in rail infrastructure transformed Africa’s economic geography, according to research by Rémi Jedwab, Edward Kerby and Alexander... More

CHRONICLE OF A WAR FORETOLD: Macroeconomic effects of spending announcements on defence

Announced changes in US public spending on defence have a significant impact on the economic behaviour of firms and households, according to research... More

TEMPORARY DISABILITY INSURANCE: Evidence from Norway of the impact of benefit levels on labour supply

The duration and outcome of spells on temporary disability insurance (TDI) depend critically on the claimants’ economic incentives as well as on local... More

LEAVING A TRADING AREA CAN LEAD TO LARGE FALLS IN INNOVATION AND PRODUCTIVITY: Evidence from the Portuguese moulds industry

Being part of a trading area like the European Union (EU) not only generates the usual gains from specialisation – with more production and investment... More

CHILDREN DO NOT BEHAVE LIKE ADULTS: New evidence on gender gaps in performance and risk-taking from TV game shows

While pre-teen girls and boys are equally willing to take risks in high-stakes situations, adult women have less of an appetite for risk than men. But... More

July 2017

PEOPLE MAY BE OVERPAYING FOR LEASE EXTENSIONS IN THE UK: Evidence from London

People may be paying too high a price to extend the leases on their homes according to new research from the London School of Economics and Political... More

TACKLING ORGANISED CRIME: New insights into designing an effective amnesty programme for whistle-blowers

New research explores how policy-makers can design programmes of judicial leniency that encourage low-level criminals with inside information on crime... More

WHY SEXUAL REPRODUCTION ONLY HAPPENS IN PAIRS: New insights into unresolved problems in evolutionary biology

New research analyses why across the natural world sexual reproduction never involves mixing the genetic material of three individuals of a species.... More

WHEN ART BECAME AN ATTRACTIVE INVESTMENT: New evidence on the valuation of artworks in wartime France

The art market in France during the Nazi occupation provided one of the best available investment opportunities, according to research by Kim... More

FALSE DIAGNOSES OF MARKET FAILURE: New insights into the buyers, pricing and coverage of insurance policies

Is it really possible to tell if insurance markets are functioning effectively without too many high- or low-risk buyers of policies? That is the... More

THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF DISTINCTIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: Evidence from London conservation areas

New research puts a price on beautiful architecture – and it is a high one. A study of London property transactions by Gabriel Ahlfeldt and Nancy... More

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