Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

COMPETITION PROTECTS NEW PARENTS FROM RIP-OFF PHARMACIES: Italian evidence

Pharmacists in small Italian cities where they are effectively monopolies will jack up the prices of products desperately needed by hard-pressed... More

‘HARMLESS’ CHEATING IN THE LAB LINKED TO MISBEHAVIOUR IN REAL LIFE

Breaking the rules. Almost daily we hear about someone who has cheated to get ahead – students using a study app to get answers for a final exam; two... More

SOCIAL DIVISIONS: India’s caste system as an exemplar of why members of different groups refuse to interact

Social divisions – such as the divisions between ‘tribes’ or ‘clans’ in developing countries, or the divisions between racial or religious groups in... More

EFFECTS OF COAL-BASED AIR POLLUTION ON MORTALITY RATES: New evidence from nineteenth century Britain

Industrialised cities in mid-nineteenth century Britain probably suffered from similar levels of air pollution as urban centres in China and India do... More

HOW CIVIL CONFLICT DISRUPTS THE ECONOMY: New evidence from the West Bank and Gaza

Conflict in Palestine in the early 2000s had a devastating effect on the economy, largely because local manufacturing firms were unable to get access... More

November 2018

TRANSLATING BOOKS: New evidence on the global diffusion of knowledge

Developing countries, which stand to benefit most from foreign knowledge, are the least able to access it. That's one of the findings of new research... More

INFLATION TARGETING AND FISCAL RULES: New evidence on what makes an effective macroeconomic policy mix

The macroeconomic policy framework – inflation targeting, fiscal rules and perhaps other institutional arrangements – should be thought of in a... More

POOLING RESOURCES IN FAMILY NETWORKS: New evidence from Mexico of the positive impact on investment in children’s education

Analysis of the impact of an anti-poverty policy that provided conditional cash transfers to poor households in Mexican villages reveals the benefits... More

THE SOVIET ECONOMIC COLLAPSE: New evidence of the potentially harmful consequences of state break-up

The dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 was one of the largest instances of state break-up in history – and it led to very large losses of... More

WHY START-UPS OFTEN CHOOSE TRADE SECRECY OVER PATENTING: New study of patents as negotiating assets

Both patents and trade secrets can be used in transferring a technology from a start-up firm to an established competitor. New research by Andreas... More

DEMAND FOR MEDICAL CARE: Evidence of the impact of ‘reference health’

How much medical care people choose to consume is influenced not just by their current health but also by the level of health to which they become... More

September 2018

LINKS BETWEEN CHINA’S SKEWED SEX RATIO AND RISING CRIME

Intense financial pressure on Chinese men to attract a partner and the behavioural effects of growing up in a male-heavy environment are making them... More

FOREIGN INVESTMENT BOOSTS SOPHISTICATION OF DOMESTIC MANUFACTURING: New evidence from Turkey

Inflows of foreign direct investment (FDI) can act as a catalyst for domestic firms to develop sophisticated manufacturing products, according to a... More

JUDGES AND THE DEATH PENALTY IN NAZI GERMANY: New research evidence on judicial discretion in authoritarian states

Do judicial courts in authoritarian regimes act as puppets for the interests of a repressive state – or do judges act with greater independence? How... More

SAVING AND BORROWING: Poor households in Pakistan see no distinction among microfinance products

The distinction between microlending and microsaving is largely illusory, according to research by Uzma Afzal, Giovanna d’Adda, Marcel Fafchamps,... More

GETTING UNEMPLOYED YOUTH INTO WORK: Evidence from Ethiopia on the effectiveness of transport subsidies

Unemployed youth in urban Ethiopia who are provided with transport subsidies increase the intensity with which they look for work and are more likely... More

EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE MIGRATION ON LONG-RUN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: Evidence from Argentina’s fertile plains pre-1914

During the age of mass migration (1850-1914), an unprecedented flow of Europeans migrated to the fertile plains in Argentina, and the skills they... More

DANIEL ELLSBERG AND JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES MEET AT AN URN: New research on the impact of ambiguity and complexity on decision-making

New research identifies a perception-based trait that lies at the heart of a decision-making paradox attributed to a 1961 study, ‘Risk, Ambiguity, and... More

BENEFITS OF CHINA’S EXPANSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION: New evidence of the boost to productivity, especially in high-skill industries

The surge in the size of China’s college-educated workforce since the early 2000s is helping Chinese firms to catch up with the technology frontier,... More

GROWTH, TRADE AND WAR: Economic history lessons for today’s global powers

Industrialisation requires the import of natural resources, potentially leading a rising power to trigger war either against a resource-rich country... More

SHIFTING THE TAX BURDEN ONTO FUTURE GENERATIONS: New study of the political economy of deficit bias and immigration

In societies where the share of immigrants and their descendants is growing rapidly, governments will increasingly rely on debt rather than current... More

August 2018

PAYING FOR LUCK: New evidence on the performance and compensation of corporate bosses

Chief executive officers (CEOs) are often rewarded for aspects of their firms’ performance that are outside their control but which are influenced by... More

EXPERT EVALUATORS FAVOURING THEIR COMPATRIOTS: Evidence from dressage competitions

The equestrian sport of dressage is the only Olympic competition in which men and women compete as equals with the outcomes determined by subjective... More

PEOPLE MAY BE OVERPAYING FOR LEASE EXTENSIONS IN THE UK: Evidence from London

People may be paying too high a price to extend the leases on their homes according to new research from the London School of Economics and Political... More

THE IMPACT OF ADVERTISING ON CONSUMPTION: New aggregate evidence

Because of advertising, people work more to consume more. According to research by Benedetto Molinari and Francesco Turino, published in the August... More

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