Media Briefings

The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

FINDING WORK ON THE INTERNET: New evidence of the growing effectiveness of online job search

Jobseekers who go online to find work experience 25% shorter unemployment spells than people who do not use the internet. That is one of the... More

GERMANY’S LABOUR MARKET: The key reform was not benefit cuts but improving the way unemployed workers are matched to job vacancies

Inefficiencies in the process by which unemployed workers were matched to open positions were the main causes of rigidities in Germany’s labour market... More

CHINA’S RENMINBI IS ALREADY A DOMINANT GLOBAL CURRENCY: New evidence of the emerging ‘tripolar’ monetary system

China’s renminbi has become a key driver of currency movements in Asia since the mid-2000s and especially since the global financial crisis. For... More

INEQUALITY IN BIG CITIES: Why urbanisation makes the world more unequal

Large cities are more unequal than the nations that host them, according to research by Kristian Behrens and Frederic Robert-Nicoud, published in the... More

TERM SPREADS AND BANK PROFITABILITY: New evidence of how quantitative easing can influence long-term interest rates and future output

The term spread – an important component of the difference between short- and long-term interest rates – is strongly influenced by banks’ expectations... More

December 2014

BUSINESS INVESTMENT IN R&D: More likely to be a shortfall than an excess

Business policies that encourage firms to invest more in research and development (R&D) are likely to boost growth, according to research by... More

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF PUBLIC SPENDING IN A FINANCIAL CRISIS: Evidence from 1990s Japan on the key role of firms’ financial distress

The impact of government spending on output is smaller when firms are experiencing financial distress. That is the central finding of a study by... More

November 2014

HAPPY CHILDREN BECOME SATISFIED ADULTS, SUCCESSFUL CHILDREN LESS SO

Research published in the November 2014 issue of the Economic Journal challenges the basic assumption of educational policy – that academic... More

POSITIVE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF UK IMMIGRATION FROM THE EUROPEAN UNION: New evidence

European immigrants to the UK have paid more in taxes than they received in benefits, helping to relieve the fiscal burden on UK-born workers and... More

GENERATIONAL DIFFERENCES IN ECONOMIC OUTCOMES OF IMMIGRANTS: Evidence from Norway

The children of 1970s immigrants from Pakistan and Turkey have assimilated well into Norwegian society, achieving educational and labour market... More

IMPATIENT ADOLESCENTS DO WORSE LATER IN LIFE

People who were impatient during their adolescence do less well at school and in the labour market; they are also more likely to suffer from ill... More

THE EFFECT OF IMMIGRATION ON PUBLIC FINANCES

Data on social attitudes show that the perceived burden of immigration on a nation’s public finances is one of the strongest economic concerns... More

October 2014

HIGHLY EDUCATED AMERICAN WOMEN NO LONGER HAVE FEWER KIDS

Since the turn of the millennium, highly educated women in the United States have had higher fertility rates than women with intermediate levels of... More

September 2014

EMPLOYERS COMPENSATE THEIR STAFF FOR HIGHER COSTS OF COMMUTING: Evidence from Denmark

When a firm relocates, employees who face longer commuting times are more likely to receive a wage increase. That is the central finding of research... More

TOO CLOSE COLLABORATION BETWEEN STUDENTS REDUCES OVERALL PERFORMANCE: Classroom evidence on the effects of social interactions

University students who go to many of the same classes will help each other when one of them is off sick or otherwise distracted from their studies.... More

IMMIGRATION BOOSTS THE PAY OF LESS EDUCATED NATIVES; EMIGRATION DOES THE OPPOSITE

Governments in rich countries should worry less about immigration and more about the potential consequences for job creation and less-skilled workers... More

CONSUMER BENEFITS FROM EUROPEAN MOBILE TELECOMS REGULATION

European telecoms regulations to reduce the cost of calls on mobile networks have improved both industry efficiency and consumer wellbeing. But while... More

PRESERVING CULTURAL DIVERSITY IS BEST DONE BY COMPETITION NOT PROTECTIONISM: New analysis of parents, TV and cultural change

An unregulated TV industry is not a threat to cultural diversity as long as there are plenty of competing channels and programme-makers. That is the... More

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS? New evidence on social links and economic outcomes

How should researchers investigate the true role of people’s self-reported social links in getting a job, getting a favour or simply getting... More

ELECTRICITY PRICES: Experimental evidence of the impact of ‘pivotal suppliers’

Average prices for electricity are higher when there are ‘pivotal suppliers’, whose control of significant shares of overall capacity gives them... More

UNIONS: New analysis of their impact on efficiency and employment

Unions have only a moderate impact on aggregate unemployment, according to research by Christian Bauer and Joerg Lingens, published in the September... More

August 2014

ECONOMIC MODELS AS ANALOGIES

Much of modern economic theory is concerned with generating insightful analogies about the way the world works rather than accurate rules. That is the... More

‘LOW EMISSION ZONES’: Incentives to switch to green vehicles produce big health benefits

‘Low emission zones’ (LEZs) in major cities like London and Berlin can reduce life-threatening air pollution dramatically by encouraging drivers to... More

MANAGEMENT AND UNIVERSITY PERFORMANCE: Good practices have a big impact on research and teaching outcomes

There are big differences in management practices in UK universities, notably in how well they manage the recruitment, retention and promotion of... More

SWEDEN’S ‘GREEN CAR REBATE’: The impact on the environment and the market for new cars

An environmental policy in Sweden aimed at buyers and manufacturers of new cars reduced the market share of Swedish and German firms producing... More

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