Media Briefings

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The RES distributes Media Briefings summarising new economic research findings presented at its annual conference and published in each issue of The Economic Journal. Media briefings are also distributed in connection with other RES events and activities, such as the Annual Public Lecture and the Policy Lecture series.

To display media briefings for the current and past years, please click on the year selectors above.

Annual Conference Reports/Overviews produced by conference rapporteurs, leading economics journalists attending conference, are also available.

If you would like to receive these briefings via email, please contact RES Media Consultant, Romesh Vaitilingam, on +44-7768-661095 (email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

Featured Media Briefings

MORE SUNSHINE WON’T MAKE YOU HAPPIER: New research on weather and wellbeing

MORE SUNSHINE WON’T MAKE YOU HAPPIER: New research on weather and wellbeing New research dispels the commonly believed notion that rain, or periods of... More

LONDON’S CONGESTION CHARGE HAS MADE ROADS SAFER FOR ALL

The introduction of London’s congestion charge led to a substantial reduction in the number of accidents in the city and a significant decline in the... More

INTERGENERATIONAL WEALTH MOBILITY IN ENGLAND, 1858-2012: New evidence based on rare surnames

Descendants of the wealthy people of England in 1850 are still wealthy. They also have longer life spans than the average person; they are much more... More

WOMEN PREFER COOPERATION AT WORK; MEN LIKE COMPETITION

Women are more comfortable than men in a working environment that involves teamwork, according to a new experimental study by Peter Kuhn and Marie... More

OBESITY LINKED TO IMPATIENCE: New US evidence

People with low levels of patience have a greater chance of becoming obese, particularly at a time when meat and high-calorie foods are relatively... More

March 2015

WESTERN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE DOESN’T NECESSARILY IMPROVE BUSINESS PERFORMANCE: Evidence from India

Indian firms in which ownership is concentrated in one family do not perform less well than those using Anglo-American corporate governance, according... More

WHEN HOUSE PRICES FALL, HOUSEHOLD SAVINGS DON’T GO UP: Evidence from the Netherlands

People are not using the value of their homes as a way to save, according to new analysis of Dutch data. The research by Eduard Suari-Andreu, to be... More

FISCAL SUSTAINABILITY IN THE EUROZONE PERIPHERY: New evidence on policy responses to budget deficits

High interest rate premia on Greek public debt reflect two things, according to research by Roberto De Santis and colleagues to be presented at the... More

PRICES ON THE INTERNET: More flexible than in conventional stores but still not fully flexible

The internet has changed our shopping habits, but it hasn't created the near-perfect price flexibility that classical economic models would predict or... More

HOW DO YOU STOP YOUR DAUGHTER BECOMING A TEENAGE MUM? Expect the best for them

Girls whose parents expect them to stay at school are less likely to become parents in their teens, according to new research to be presented at the... More

BIG PRODUCTIVITY LOSSES FROM OUTSIZED PUBLIC SECTORS IN RESOURCE-RICH COUNTRIES: New study of the resource curse

The puzzle that countries rich in natural resources often have worse economic outcomes than similar countries without the same resources may be due to... More

ILLEGAL DISCRIMINATION STILL SIGNIFICANT AND PERSISTENT: New survey of 70 studies over the last 15 years

If you are black, foreign, female, elderly, disabled, gay, obese or not a member of the dominant caste or religion in your community, you may face... More

CLICKS MEAN COVERAGE: How popularity drives the news

Readers’ interest in online news is driving the hard news agenda – but not by dumbing it down. That is the conclusion of new research into the... More

GENDER BIAS KEEPS MORTALITY RATES OF NEW MOTHERS HIGH

In countries where there are still strong prejudices against women, mortality rates of new mothers remain high despite the easy availability of... More

THE CRISIS OF TRUST IN SCIENCE: Evaluating solutions to the problem of false positives

Discouraging minor statistical sloppiness by scientists will reduce more severe questionable research practices such as outright data manipulation.... More

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS AND EARLY CAREER SUCCESS IN ECONOMICS: The impact of the academic publishing process

Talented researchers from less prominent institutions have to work harder and overcome larger hurdles to publish on a par with otherwise equivalent... More

BEHAVIOURAL BIAS IN EMPIRICAL RESEARCH: Evidence from top economics journals

There is a strong behavioural bias in empirical research, according to a new study by Yanos Zylberberg to be presented at the Royal Economic Society’s... More

THE ROLE OF CONFERENCES ON THE PATHWAY TO ACADEMIC IMPACT: Evidence from a natural experiment

Presenting an academic paper at a large conference can be expected to gain the authors 17-30 readers over the subsequent two years, and the effect is... More

THE BUSINESS CYCLES OF EUROZONE COUNTRIES: More out of sync now than before the single currency was launched

For at least 50 years, there has been no synchronisation of the business cycles of countries that are now members of the Eurozone. What’s more,... More

PERFORMANCE PAY: UK evidence of its impact on rising inequality

Performance pay was one factor behind the increase in wage inequality among higher earners in the run-up to the recession. That is the central finding... More

BUDGET CUTS WORSEN THE PUBLIC DEBT BURDEN WITH INTEREST RATES AT THE ZERO LOWER BOUND

Developed countries that are cutting their budgets in the aftermath of the global financial crisis are pushing themselves into deeper debt given that... More

RECESSIONS DAMAGES THE HEALTH OF YOUNG ADULTS: US evidence

Young people who start work during a recession are more likely to have health problems, according to research by Naijia Guo to be presented at the... More

INVESTING IN HIGHER EDUCATION GIVES A BIG GROWTH BOOST TO POOR COUNTRIES

Poor countries should pay much more attention to raising their skilled human capital, according to research by Fabio Cerina and Fabio Manca to be... More

WEEKEND OPENING OF GP SURGERIES CAN SOLVE A&E OVERLOAD

The crisis in Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments, with many stretched to breaking point, would be much less serious if patients had better... More

MORE PAWNSHOPS, MORE THEFT: US evidence

The wider availability of pawnshops leads to an increase in burglaries, according to research by Rocco d’Este to be presented at the Royal Economic... More

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